Langley Hospice Society 30 Years of Compassionate Support 30 Years of Compassionate Support Langley Hospice Society
The Langley Hospice Society is committed to providing emotional, practical and spiritual support for people who are living with a terminal illness, their family and friends, throughout the last stages of illness, at the time of death and bereavement.

MEMORIAL WALL


Langley Hospice Society is pleased to present the Celebrate a Life memorial wall, a place where those we love are remembered.

This section is made up of writings from people who have experienced the loss through death of someone they love. In their grief journey, it has helped them to share the story of their loss. Some of the pages end with a way for you to connect directly with them.

Visit the Memorial Wall

EVENTS

Physical Activities for Grief

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Langley Hospice Society

In addition to palliative care and support for people facing life-threatening illnesses, Langley Hospice Society programs include much-needed, individual and group grief support programs, for children, teens, adults and families; education; advocacy; volunteer training; a resource library; day camps and a summer camp for grieving children and teens. Programs are FREE of charge. Langley Hospice also operates their Second Story Treasures Thrift Store in Walnut Grove, open Tuesday to Saturday. For more information regarding the Langley Hospice Society, please visit: www.langleyhospice.com
Langley Hospice Society
Langley Hospice Society22 minutes ago
Don't forget to REGISTER for our upcoming Advance Care Planning Workshop ONLINE, on the following dates, in partnership with Fraser Health's Advance Care Planning Team:

Dates:
• Tuesday June 16, 2020 10am-12pm
• Wednesday June 24, 2020 7pm-9pm

Length: 1.5hrs of workshop, with 20-30min of questions/discussion

Style: Workshop based, will focus on a workbook developed by FH, attendees will either need to have electronic or paper copies in front of them during the session.

REGISTERING: This workshop is FREE and open to the public, but you are asked to REGISTER in ADVANCE by visiting us online at: www.langleyhospice.com/acpworkshop .

Workbook: Here is the link to the workbook, participants are asked to download and print a copy in advance of the workshop:
https://patienteduc.fraserhealth.ca/…/my-advance-care-plan-…

Laura and Lauren from FH will be facilitating the session(s) via Zoom and we will forward out a link via email to registered participants, and will also provide a fill-able .pdf for them to update and save on their own computer, once they’ve completed the workshop.

This workshop is open to the public, so please SHARE as appropriate. This is important information for all ages and stages, and about starting important conversations with ourselves, and our friends and family as we plan for the future...AND you can participate in the comfort of your own home.
Langley Hospice Society
Langley Hospice Society4 hours ago
Grief is as unique as your loss...there is no right or wrong way to grieve...♥️
Langley Hospice Society
Langley Hospice Society6 hours ago
Hey everyone, Ria here👋🏽 The #movieoftheweek is another great movie for teens and adults. “All The Bright Places” was adapted from the book by Jenifer Niven and was released on Netflix in February this year.

“All The Bright Places tells the story of Violet Markey and Theodore Finch, who meet and change each other's lives forever. They attend the same high school in the fictional town of Bartlett, Indiana, and they meet in an unconventional way. As they struggle with the emotional and physical scars of their past, they come together through a school project, discovering that even the smallest places and moments can mean something. This compelling drama provides a refreshing and human take on the experience of mental illness, its impact on relationships, as well as the beauty and lasting impact of young love.”

A prominent theme in this film is one of mental health. The movie epilogue reads: "This film is dedicated to those who have been impacted by mental health concerns, suicide or grief. If you are struggling or know someone who is, you can find more resources at allthebrightplacesfilm.info."

“There are bright places even in dark times and that if there isn’t you can be that bright place with infinite capacities.”

Discussion Questions:

1. One thing I noticed the movie shows is that people tend not to “get over” the loss of a loved one in a time frame that society expects. Has this been your experience?
2. Laughter really is a great antidote to pain. What evidence of that did you see in the movie? Do you agree?
3. Depression is REAL. If teens say they are depressed, believe them! Why do you think that sometimes teens don’t get the mental health support they need?
4. What role did Finch play in Violet’s life? What did he teach her?
5. The impact of sibling loss is underrepresented in society. Why do you think the death of a sibling is not discussed as much as the loss of a parent or the loss of a child?
Langley Hospice Society
Langley Hospice Society1 day ago
Another article from What's Your Grief, talking about sensory memory... "I miss the sound of your voice:..."

"...Most of you are grieving, so I don’t have to tell you. You already know one of the saddest things about life after loss is that, with time, memories like the sound of a loved one’s voice, the smell of their clothes, or the feel of their arms wrapped around you start to fade.

Sensory memories are tied closely to a person’s physical presence, and, in the beginning, there’s nothing you want more. Arguably, the loss of these sensory experiences is one of the first secondary losses a person will experience after a death..."

Check out the full article here:
https://whatsyourgrief.com/sensory-memory-grief-and-loss/
Langley Hospice Society
Langley Hospice Society1 day ago
Hey everyone, Ria here👋🏽 The #teenreads book of the week is “They Both Die At The End” by Adam Silvera. This is the second one of his books I’ve read and I find his writing style fascinating. This book is available for purchase on Audible and we hope to add this title to our #resourcelibrary. I loved this book because the concept was so original and the author talks about death and dying in a way that allows readers to think about and examine their own mortality in non-threatening way.

“On September 5, a little after midnight, Death-Cast calls Mateo Torrez and Rufus Emeterio to give them some bad news: They’re going to die today. Mateo and Rufus are total strangers, but, for different reasons, they’re both looking to make a new friend on their End Day. The good news: There’s an app for that. It’s called the Last Friend, and through it, Rufus and Mateo are about to meet up for one last great adventure—to live a lifetime in a single day.”

Discussion Questions:
1. Would you want to be awake at your own funeral? Would you want a chance to say goodbye to the important people in your life?
2. Would you want to know exactly when you will die? Why or why not?
3. How do you think people would live if they knew how much time they had to live?
4. What choices you make differently if you knew how long your life would be?
5. How would the relationships with the important people in your life be different if life felt more finite?
Langley Hospice Society
Langley Hospice Society2 days ago
Hey everyone, Ria here👋🏽 The #virtualstorytime for today is “Samantha Jane’s Missing Smile: A Story about Coping with the Loss of a Parent” by: Julie Kaplow and Donna Pincus.
This book talks about the impact of the death of Samantha Jane’s father and is a great story to read to children who have experienced the death of a parent. I like this book because Samantha Jane learns that it’s okay to cry and when she’s sad and it’s okay to miss her father and the things they used to do together.

Discussion Questions:
1. What helps you get your feelings out when you feel sad?
2. Samantha Jane used to pick berries with her father every Sunday. Was there a special ritual or activity you liked to do with your person?
3. If you wrote a letter to your person, what would it say?
4. Have you ever felt happy AND sad at the same time? That’s normal when you’re grieving, although it can feel weird too.
5. Do you have someone like Samantha Jane’s neighbour who helps you with your grief feelings?
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