Volunteer Stories

The Top 10 Reasons I Volunteer at the Langley Hospice Second Story Treasures Thrift Store

1. I respect and admire the work that Langley Hospice Society does. 2. I love volunteering because it is my chance to give something back to the community. 3. I like the management and the fact that they are well-organized. 4. I like my fellow volunteers.  We have fun! 5. I enjoy meeting new people. 6. I am proud of Wayne, my husband, who is Mr. Fix It at the store on Monday mornings. 7. I am a shopper who loves clothes and each day I am impressed with the quality of the donations that    come in the door. Note:  I must wait, like everyone else, to purchase any item after it has been priced and displayed in the store. 8. I get out of the house. 9. I get a coffee break - often with goodies! 10. I feel appreciated. Colleen McLaren Second Story Treasures Thrift Store Volunteer
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Why Do You Volunteer At The Hospice Residence? A Personal Perspective

When I began volunteering at the Residence about 1½ years ago, I very quickly became aware of how often the question is asked: “Why do you do this type of work?”  Well, the answer is simple, isn't it? Actually no, it is not that simple; at least I believe it is not easy for most. Initially I was a little flummoxed for an appropriate and honest answer to the question. Simply to say something along the lines of “I like to help and talk to people” or to respond in some similar fashion seemed a superficial answer that lacked substance and did not give a comprehensive explanation. I pondered the question, and still do so to some extent, because our lives are an evolving sequences of experiences, observations and events that over time influence and shape and may change our perspectives, thoughts and opinions. As anyone knows who is involved with hospice work of any type, it is one of the greater privileges in life to become a confidante to someone who is experiencing end-of-life or with an...
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The Perfect Fit

After the passing of my husband Pat, I began seeking supportive services through Langley Hospice Society. After a few sessions, a volunteer opportunity at the Second Story Thrift Store was recommended to me as a way to assist me during my grieving and to help me out of my “solitary confinement”. I heard of the wonderful people and vision that the store entailed and the important sense of contribution volunteering provides. Although I was hesitant at first, as this would be my first experience as a volunteer, I conjured up the courage to fill out an application. Soon after the interview process, I found myself working and laughing amongst the warm-hearted individuals at Second Story Treasures. The brilliant cohesion and genuine care demonstrated amid the volunteers and staff provided me with the normality I was seeking and helped me build my confidence on a daily basis. Initially given the task of repairing and cleaning jewellery, I received a quick “promotion” to pricing and...
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Being a Hospice Volunteer

When my beloved husband was dying of colon cancer in1998, after an almost five-year struggle, Dorscie Paterson from Langley Hospice Society reached out to me, in Langley Memorial, and made me aware of this wonderful group. Each evening when I returned home from the hospital, there was an encouraging message from Dorscie that really helped ease my pain and grief.... I decided then that I wanted to know more about and become involved with "this Hospice stuff". After taking the hospice training, my first job as a volunteer was working in the office, answering the phones, and running off thousands of pages of Hospice Brochures to be distributed throughout the community. From there I started doing "One on One" visiting in the home with our bereavement clients. This led me into Palliative Care in the Hospital, and then into our beautiful Hospice Residence visiting the patients. The years have flown by and I have met the most delightful people along the way, including the patients and their...
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Helping One Another

While doing my volunteer work at the hospice residence, I recently spent the better part of my shift visiting with a very discontented patient, whose health seemed to be getting worse day by day. This particular evening was a very lonely one for him – no visitors – and when he asked me to stay and talk, I naturally complied. Our conversation started about his family and as he talked, he began to act worried and distressed. I encouraged him to talk it out and very rapidly the conversation progressed into an intimate sort of emotional confession regarding his grown son. He had disowned this son over thirty-five years ago, and explained to me the circumstances leading up to their conflict. He knew he was going to die soon, and he wanted to see his son one last time, tell him how sorry he was and how much he loved him. He told me, several times, that it was his dying wish to do this. At first, I felt a reluctance to get involved in the “Family Dance”, but I was very emotionally moved by...
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My Hospice Volunteering Experience

In 2002, I spent a month with my sister in a Duluth, Georgia Hospice. Gail was diagnosed with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (rare, degenerative brain disorder) in mid-July and died in September. We shared a room growing up, as young women before we married and shared a room on her final journey. We had gone full circle. The Hospice was a warm caring environment for all family members and patients. It was this experience with my sister that eventually led me to look into what I could do for hospice here in Langley. I became a Hospice volunteer almost 6.5 years ago; I started off by helping with the newsletter. Then when a sewing group started, I was asked to join, although at the time I was not a sewer. I took sewing lessons and then quilting lessons. We make quilts for children going through the grieving process. When a child goes through bereavement support, either individually or in a group, he/she receives a comfort quilt at the end of their program. I also help out with...
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Langley Hospice Residence: One Volunteer’s Experience

Upon the table a small light was on and gently flickering as I entered the building. I approached the table to read the writing upon the card in front of the light. As I came closer I could see a young woman standing in the hall, her body pressed against the rail. She was trembling, her hands pressed to her mouth, with tears falling upon her cheeks. I moved towards her, my purse still over my shoulder, and extended my arms to her. We both took a step towards each other and my arms encircled her. No words were spoken as she put her head upon my shoulder and I held her close. Time passed, her tears subsided and she stood back. She was composed as she spoke only two words, “thank you”. So what building is this? What do the light and the card represent? Why was this young woman crying? I have entered a Hospice Residence. In direct line with the outside door is a table where the small light is encased within a stained glass stand. This light is turned on for twenty-four hours to honour...
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Hospice Volunteer Experiences

One evening I sat with a man who appeared to be sleeping. I stayed for a few minutes, quietly watching, before moving on to visit others. When I returned later, he was awake. I told him that I had come in earlier. He said, "I knew you were there". It made me realize that my presence was important to the people in care, even if not always acknowledged. One time, I sat with a woman while her visiting daughter shared memories of her mother. The stories revolved around the everyday actions of a mother. The mundane deeds and loving functions that showed how much her mother cared for her family. It was the little things that mattered most, in the end, and the daughter wanted me, and her mother, to know how much they meant to her. On another shift, I met a woman who had just arrived from England to be with her father. Once here, she was reluctant to leave the hospice, even for a short time, to get settled into her accommodation. Finally, she asked me if I would stay with her father while...
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My First Year at Hospice

After having spent a year as a volunteer at our Langley Hospice Residence, I have been contemplating what this year has meant to me; what I have learned, and what I have been able to give.  I believe my hospice work actually started two years ago as I sat with my own mother at a hospice in Regina. It was then that I decided this was where I would volunteer. In the past I have served on numerous boards and committees. From all of them I have learned a tremendous amount, and worked with very dedicated, knowledgeable, and community minded people. So why is this different for me?  I am now privileged to be on a different journey. This is a journey where those we meet even for so short a time, need so little from us but give us so much. It is where simple things are important, like a cup of tea with a lady who just smiles and touches your hand. It is a hug, without words, or an opportunity to listen to a family’s story about their loved one. It is giving a grieving family time, care and...
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One Hospice Volunteer’s Viewpoint

I've been working as a hospice volunteer now since December, 2007. It was a choice that surprised many of my family and friends - my youngest son even said, "Mum, you won't be able to do that - you're too emotional"! But, that's what I'm doing, and I love it. It all started with my own grieving process ten years ago. My Dad, a vital, intelligent man, was struck down by a stroke during heart surgery. For three months he lingered in hospitals, while the family watched his body and mind slowly shut down. We felt helpless - unable to understand what was happening, unable to assist our father in his final leave-taking. The nursing staff was always changing. No one gave us the information we needed and we were unaware that hospice support existed. Nothing would have made my father's death easier to accept, but knowledge and support could have made his passage less fearful for him and less agonizing for us. After that experience, and ever since I learned hospice care services existed, I had...
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SECOND STORY TREASURES THRIFT STORE

Store hours:

Tuesday - Saturday, 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Donations of gently used clothing and household items may be dropped off:

Monday, 9:00 am - 3:30 pm
Tuesday - Friday, 9:00 am - 4:30 pm
Saturday, 9:00 am - 3:30 pm

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Events